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How to say I love you in Japanese

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Saturday, September 19, 2009
Japanese to English Love Words and Phrases:
Activities for the Classroom: How Do You Write I Love You in Japanese?

Additionally, characters aren't always clearly written, as opposed to when they're printed on a screen, and there are other more cursive styles of writing that can make it crucial to write in proper stroke order. Draw a medium-length horizontal line, starting on the left and going to the right. Draw a short horizontal line going from left to right. If you need to, practice a few times to get it right.

Draw a short horizontal line, going from left to right. Starting from the top, draw a slightly curved vertical line, and curve it back up at the end. Start with the top line. Writing from left to right, draw a line of medium length. Sometimes, the first line will curve slightly and "hook" back, as shown in the picture above. Start from the top.

Draw a slightly curved vertical line, and "hook" it back up once you've reached the end of the line. For more advanced Japanese learners, it may be worth giving kanji a try. Write a sharp line. To start writing the kanji for "suki", begin by drawing a vertical line from top-to-bottom that leans to the left. Then, change the direction it's moving in, so that the line, while still vertical, is directing towards the right.

Draw a sharp curve. Start by drawing a horizontal line, going from left to right. Then make a sharp diagonal angle back inwards, stopping when your pen or pencil is perpendicular to the center of the horizontal line. Continue writing, but vertically, until you reach the bottom of the line you're writing on; once the line is that long, curve it back upwards a small amount.

Write a short horizontal line, going from left to right. Draw a curved line. To begin writing the kanji for "ai", start between the center and the top of the line and draw a slightly curved line, going from left to right. Make three small dashes. Underneath your first stroke for the kanji, write three short, slightly tilted lines.

Start with the leftmost dash, and write from top to bottom. This dash starts slightly to the left of where the first stroke started, and it doesn't matter whether it connects to your first stroke or not. Underneath and to the left of the three dashes, write a slightly diagonal line going from top to bottom.

This dash should be short. Write a hooked line. Starting next to the top of the dash you just wrote, write a straight line, then "hook" it back around once it's longer than the first stroke you made the curved line.

To the left of the hooked line, draw a slightly diagonal dash going from top to bottom. The dash should be going left to right. Draw another hooked line. Next to the dash you just wrote, draw a line that hooks upwards, going from left to right. It should be shorter than the first hooked line.

Draw a small dash. Above the center of the hooked line, draw a diagonal, slightly curved dash going from left to right. The dash should be extremely short. To the right of your second hooked line, draw a diagonal dash that tips from left to right.

Write it from top to bottom. Underneath and to the left of the second hooked line, write a short stroke resembling a dash. It should tip from right to left. Write a "fu" in katakana. Write a curved stroke. Starting halfway down the stroke written before the previous one, write a curved line going from left to right.

The stroke should end where the previous stroke curves. Draw a short line. The first stroke in the kanji for "koi" is a simple short line, centered above where the rest of the kanji will be written. This line is drawn diagonally from top to bottom. Draw a horizontal line. The next stroke is a horizontal line that is much longer than the line you initially drew. It should converge with your first stroke, and goes from left to right.

If you're having trouble getting it to look right, think of it as drawing a flat lid to a jar. The short vertical stroke the "handle" will be in the center, connecting with the actual "lid" the horizontal stroke of the jar.

They also do not as readily say 'I love you. This is written using katakana as it originates from the English word for love. In Japanese pronunciation, it would be spelled as rabu.

As in gitaigo and giseigo, the phrase is repeated. At the end of this lesson, students should be able to say 'I love you' in Japanese by correctly saying 'ai shiteiru. The most common way to say 'I love you' is 'ai shiteru.

Shiteru is the present continuous tense of the verb suru to do. The first phrase is how one would write 'ai shiteiru' in its entirety including the kanji for love, or ai. Then, the kanji for love, or ai, is by itself. Saying 'Ai Shiteru' to someone who is not ready to hear it or not used to hearing it may be scary, so do not say this to just anyone.

It is also not a friendly form of love that you would say to a best friend, pet, or someone you care about. This is a phrase you would use in moments of strong feeling. Notice that both of the kanji used when referring to love contain the kanji for heart, or 'kokoro. Another word used for love is kou. It is not usually used to say 'I love you' directly but is used in combination with the kanji for hito to make the word, koibito or lover as seen in the second example.

Writing it in a poem may be just the appropriate way, although ironically Japanese poetry is geared more toward giving the allusion of love without saying it directly.

Comprehension:

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In Japanese, the word "love" is "ai," which is written like this: 愛. The verb "to love" is "aisuru" (愛する). A literal translation of the phrase "I love you" in Japanese would be .

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I was a bit hesitant to take on “How to Say ‘I love you’ in Japanese.” I think I’ve seen about 38, posts on how to say “I love you” in foreign languages.

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Writing 'I Love You' in Japanese. The most common way to say 'I love you' is 'ai shiteru.' Ai is the word for love and has a commonly used kanji to write it. Shiteru is the present continuous tense of the verb suru (to do). The first phrase is how one would write 'ai shiteiru' in its entirety including the kanji for love, or ai. The name combines the kanji characters for love and child 愛 子. The kanji koi 恋 is rarely used as a name. Kanji Tattoos for Love. Some people are interested in getting a tattoo of a kanji symbol. You may want to consider at length whether ai or koi is the one that you want to have tattooed.

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When you start learning a language your first questions concern Hi, Thank you, Welcom, I love You, etc. In Japanese, "love" is written as If you need more help in writing, go to valencia-cityguide.ga / and you will find good service. Finally, below is the hiragana writing of the Japanese way to say "I love you": Generally, the Japanese don't express love too openly. Though aishiteru is the literal Japanese way to say "I love you" the way we do in English, the .